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The School-Ready Child

Zero-to-Three offers a colorful infographic, entitled “The School-Ready Child” (o “Listos para la escuela” en español). In it the authors describe the reasons why getting ready for school begins in early childhood and the need for public policies that “focus on the healthy development of babies and toddlers as an essential part of preparing children for success.” They outline five important features of the school-ready child:

1. It’s all about relationships.
2. Everyday experiences shape early learning.
3. The importance of emotions.
4. The importance of play.
5. What a school-ready child looks like.

It’s a great reminder of the value of early intervention. EI providers support…

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Zero to Three offers an excellent video resource entitled, “From Feelings to Friendships: Nurturing Healthy Social-Emotional Development in the Early Years.” It is part of their “Magic of Everyday Moments” series. The video describes the importance of the parent-child bond in building a child’s “ability to form relationships with others, express emotions, and face difficult challenges.” Supportive relationships encourage young children to “explore the world, develop empathy, and understand the difference between right and wrong.” The video offers ways parents can develop strong bonds and nurturing relationships with their young children. There’s also a tip sheet, which we’ve included here for easy access. It might be a great handout for the families you serve. Let us know in the comments below what you think.…

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The Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University offers the field a timely infographic entitled “What We Can Do About Toxic Stress.” It explains the concept using a clever analogy of an overburdened truck hauling too much cargo and offers some practical advice about ways to lighten the load. “Just as a truck can only bear so much weight before it . . . stops moving forward, challenging life circumstances can weigh caregivers down (making) it hard to do the things they need and want to do.” The infographic suggests seeking out supports and services that “allow caregivers to focus on caring for themselves and their children,” such as food pantries, free activities for children and families, connecting with other parents, and…

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8354148859?profile=RESIZE_400x This is exciting! The folks at the University of Washington’s Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences (I-LABS) have published a 25-minute online module on the topic of attachment. Development of Attachment: Learn How Children Form Lasting Bonds with Their Caregivers contains a series of narrated slides as well as a handout and a discussion guide in case an early intervention team would like to view it as a group. The presentation is currently available in English only, but I-LABS has plans to repost it in Spanish, Vietnamese, and Somali. Transcripts of each narrated slide are also available as is an extensive list of the references cited. If attachment is an area of interest, be sure to check this module out. Then leave us a comment below to tell us what you thought.

The…

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This publication from the CDC outlines strategies and approaches intended to be used in combination as part of a comprehensive effort to help ensure that all children have safe, stable, nurturing relationships and environments in which to thrive and achieve lifelong health and success.

Download the "Preventing ACES" publication.

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Image showing the first page of the Building Resilience guide Researchers at Zero to Three have developed a guide for early childhood professionals to support parents and caregivers in fostering their child's resilience to adversity. From ZerotoThree.org: 

"In this brief, the authors explain how resilience can be recognized and fostered at four levels: the individual, the family, the school and caregiving systems, and the larger community. They also suggest ways that parents can build their child’s resilience on a daily basis by teaching self-care, emphasizing the positive, building a strong parent-child bond, reading together, encouraging social skills, maintaining a daily routine, nurturing self-esteem, and practicing reflection."

Visit the Zero to Three website to…

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“Self-regulation is the act of managing thoughts and feelings to enable goal-directed actions.” It’s a set of skills we begin working on right after birth and continue refining through adulthood. Self-regulation is an important goal for infants and toddlers as it enables them to shift the focus of their attention, soothe themselves, adjust their behavior, and seek help from others when it’s needed.

This two-page snapshot from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services describes ways in which parents and caregivers can observe self-regulation in very young children, strategies they can use to support its development, and the research behind “lessons learned about interventions to promote self-regulation in infants and toddlers.”…

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3679909502?profile=RESIZE_710x Teaching Your Child to: Identify and Express Emotions from the Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) at Vanderbilt University offers actionable tips for caregivers on how to use everyday opportunities to help children learn about their feelings.  

You can check out this resource and more at the CSEFEL site here: http://csefel.vanderbilt.edu/

Download the resource directly to your device here: https://wested.box.com/shared/static/x0lyydphf30decczxpdv7pqd2hngjhfk.pdf

 

 

The ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM) describes…

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The National Child Traumatic Stress Network and the National Center for PTSD have come together to produce a handout on Psychological First Aid, which offers parents “Tips for Helping Infants and Toddlers after Disasters.” This detailed and easy-to-read resource examines behaviors young children typically display after a disaster as well as what parents should know about and do in response to those behaviors.

Here’s an example:

If your child has problems sleeping . . .

Understand that children often dream about things they fear and can be scared of going to sleep . . . when children are scared, they want to be with people who help them feel safe, and they worry when you are not together . . .

Ways to Help: Hold him and tell him that he is safe, that you are there and will not leave . . . this…

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