Resources on Family Support

This week we’re highlighting an informative article from the journal Childhood Obesity 15(3):206-215. In “Adverse Childhood Experiences in Infancy and Toddlerhood Predict Obesity and Health Outcomes in Middle Childhood,” McKelvey and her colleagues expand on the knowledge derived from the well-known Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) study, that indicated the “negative effects of childhood trauma on adult weight and health.” The authors specifically looked at the association between “ACEs in early childhood and their correlation to obesity and other health-related issues in middle childhood.” 

Data came from 1335 demographically diverse families in an Early Head Start study, when children were ages 1, 2, 3, and 11. Analysis of these data indicated “significant associations between (ACEs) in infancy/toddlerhood and obesity, respiratory problems, taking regular nonattention-related…

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The Story of Max

“The Story of Max” is an animated video resource designed to provide parents with an introduction to the Early Start program, guiding them through the evaluation, assessment, and IFSP processes to the point where services are received!

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10237745298?profile=RESIZE_180x180 This week we are highlighting a resource from the Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) entitled, “Understanding Your Child’s Behavior: Reading Your Child’s Cues from Birth to Age 2.” It’s a very interesting and quick read, filled with practical examples and age-specific suggestions. The authors also include, “Three Steps to Understanding Your Baby’s or Toddler’s Behavior,” which is intended to help parents sort out the meaning of the cues they may see and hear from their young child. There’s also a fourth bonus step on viewing tantrums as communication with a variety of effective ways to respond. Check out this week’s resource…

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How Do Babies Learn to Crawl?

9914251882?profile=RESIZE_400x How Do Babies Learn to Crawl? is an interesting article from our colleagues at Zero to Three. The authors take the pressure off parents who might be expecting crawling by a specific age. They also define three different types of movement that many babies go through, which includes the traditional hands and knees crawl pattern, with the caveat that “it can take a while to get moving, and that’s okay.” They offer half a dozen strategies parents can try to support their babies in learning to move. Ultimately, the authors say, “there’s no wrong way to crawl” and note that some babies skip that stage altogether! Let us know your thoughts in the comments below. 

The…

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The Clerc Center at Gallaudet University offers 15 Principles for Reading to Deaf Children. The principles are described as “best practices for how to read aloud to Deaf and Hard of Hearing children” in American Sign Language. The principles were derived from research on how Deaf parents read to their Deaf children and are presented here as tips for both parents and educators about the skills and strategies useful in sharing books with young children. The principles are contained in one 15-minute video, which is captioned and voiced for non-signers. The site also provides bookmarks within the video so that a viewer can access a specific strategy without having to scan through the entire video. We think you’ll like it, so take a look. Let us know what you…

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The Family Focus Resource & Empowerment Center in L.A. produced this terrific video to share “Five Things You Can Do to Make Your Family Strong.” The content is based on the Five Protective Factors you may have heard about. Watch the video to learn more. It’s also available with Spanish subtitles if you click here.

The ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM) describes core knowledge and role-specific competencies needed for early intervention service provision, incorporating current research and evidence in the field of early intervention. To access the ESPM,…

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The Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University offers the field a timely infographic entitled “What We Can Do About Toxic Stress.” It explains the concept using a clever analogy of an overburdened truck hauling too much cargo and offers some practical advice about ways to lighten the load. “Just as a truck can only bear so much weight before it . . . stops moving forward, challenging life circumstances can weigh caregivers down (making) it hard to do the things they need and want to do.” The infographic suggests seeking out supports and services that “allow caregivers to focus on caring for themselves and their children,” such as food pantries, free activities for children and families, connecting with other parents, and…

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The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers a wealth of resources on its website. The one we’d like to call your attention to this week is entitled Information on Safety in the Home & Community for Parents with Infants & Toddlers (Ages 0-3). Click on the title to be taken directly to the site. There you’ll find a series of links on topics ranging from burns to medicine safety to water safety and everything in between. These links will take you to topic-specific pages within CDC’s website, many of which include prevention tips. Once you’ve explored, leave us a comment below to let us know which topic you found to be most useful in your day-to-day work with families.

 

 

The ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM) describes core…

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In a “From Principles to Practice” Learning Brief, entitled “Building a Family Engagement Culture,” the authors address two questions:

  • What does authentic family engagement look like? and
  • How can we “engage diverse families in responsive and culturally relevant ways”?

In order to answer these questions, local advocates in L.A. County “developed a shared definition of family engagement” and outlined five guiding principles to “build upon the work of national advocates and stress the need to embed practices across the systems and settings that serve families with young children.”

The five guiding principles are as follows:

  1. Foster mutual respect, trusting relationships, and shared responsibility and leadership;
  2. Engaging families where they are;
  3. Respect, value, and be responsive to cultural and linguistic assets;
  4. Support strong social networks and connections; and
  5. Foster an integrated and…
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