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parents (11)

Practice Guides for Parents from CELL

The Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL) and the Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute offer parents of infants and toddlers a host of resources on their site. These include practice guides for parents to provide their young children with “fun and exciting literacy learning experiences and opportunities.” The site also includes CELLcasts—video versions of the practice guides—and CELLposters, which can be used as quick reminders about practices parents want to try. Selected practice guides are also available in Spanish and with adaptations written specifically with children who have disabilities in mind. “The practice guides describe everyday home, community, and childcare learning opportunities that encourage early literacy learning.” Check them out!

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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disabilities magazinesThe First Words Project at Florida State University has developed a series of free resources for families of children 0-3 to help parents better understand and support their child’s development. Parents and providers can download and print checklists and information related to topics like communication, early intervention, and Autism Spectrum Disorder. All resources are available in both Spanish and English, and the Communication Checklist is also available in Portuguese and Canadian French. There is also a curated list of websites of possible interest to families of young children. To access these resources, visit the First Words Project webpage at https://firstwordsproject.com/resources/.

To learn more about the First Words Project, visit https://firstwordsproject.com/about/.

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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parent hugging a kid in the newspaper

With California’s current focus on improving social-emotional outcomes for infants and toddlers with disabilities, we here at the Neighborhood are always on the lookout for helpful, family-friendly tools. One such resource is What to Expect & When to Seek Help: Bright Futures Developmental Tools for Families and Providers. Developed by Bright Futures at Georgetown University and the National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, the Tools* are available for any caretaker or professional to access and download for free, both in English and in Spanish. The Infancy tool (English version, Spanish version) and the Early Childhood tool (English version, Spanish version) are the most pertinent to those who are parenting or providing services for children receiving Early Start services. These handouts describe what to expect at each stage of social-emotional development, ways to identify both the child’s and the parent’s strengths, some guidance for talking about a child’s

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Reasons for Concern

"Reasons for Concern that your child or a child in your care may need special help" offers a brief summary of general risk factors and specific red flags for behavior, hearing, vision, movement, communication, and thinking. Created by the California Department of Education along with the Department of Developmental Services and targeting families and caregivers of children birth to age five, this easy to understand brochure provides words families can use to discuss their concerns with doctors and words childcare providers can use with families. It also offers contact information for "next steps," including referral to the local regional center or school district and assessment of the child, when needed. The 2015 version of Reasons for Concern is currently available in both English and Spanish, and both versions are posted here for your convenience. 

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit

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Tips on Helping Your Child Learn to Cooperate

mom carrying child“Cooperation is the ability to balance one’s own needs with someone else’s.” We round out the school year with an article from Zero-to-Three entitled Tips on Helping Your Child Learn to Cooperate. This resource gives concrete examples of “how cooperativeness grows across the first three years of life” and offers tips on a variety of situations, such as:

  • Taking turns,
  • Setting limits and explaining requests,
  • Taking time to problem-solve,
  • Suggesting developmentally-appropriate chores,
  • Praising cooperation, and
  • Giving choices.

It’s well worth the read. Check it out today and leave us a comment to let us know what you thought.

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

 

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baby in bed with motherThe California Early Start Central Directory of Early Intervention Resources is now online, giving early childhood service providers and families easy access to nearly 2,000 early intervention services and resources throughout the state! Use the search bar to quickly search for resources or services in your county, or explore the rest of the Central Directory site to learn more about the Early Start system, locate websites, publications and other resources, and find out how to get the help you need. 

Read more about this new format for the Early Start Central Directory on the Neighborhood:https://earlystartneighborhood.ning.com/publications/early-start-central-directory

Or visit the Directory site here: https://www.ceitan-earlystart.org/central-directory/ 

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child reading book with mom

Self-confidence is one piece of healthy social-emotional development that helps children play well with others and navigate social situations. Young children start to develop self-confidence with the support of nurturing caregivers. There are many ways that parents and caregivers can help their child feel safe, important, and confident. ZerotoThree.org published several tips for families to help grow their child’s self-confidence, which can be found here: https://www.zerotothree.org/resources/226-tips-on-helping-your-child-develop-confidence

 

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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California Home Visiting Program (CHVP)

The California Home Visiting Program or CHVP is “a preventive intervention focused on promoting positive parenting and child development.” 

 

Their services are available to pregnant women and new parents who have risk factors, such as domestic violence, inadequate income, unstable housing, limited education, substance abuse, depression and/or other mental health issues. CHVP is funded through the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program which was established in 2010 by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. It incorporates two evidence-based home visiting models, Healthy Families America and Nurse-Family Partnership, and is available in 24 of California’s 58 counties. Check it out! You may have families that would benefit greatly from this valuable service.

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood by clicking here or by

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Vroom: A Site to Help Build Your Baby's Brain

Today’s blog post highlights Vroom an interactive website that provides parents and caregivers with ways to boost early learning. Vroom says, “Great moments are all around you in the things you already do . . . to help build your baby’s brain.” This site offers pages and pages of “easy ways to nurture your child’s growing mind,” including more than two dozen ideas aimed at children ages birth to three. The site focuses on “brain building moments,” and Vroom says, “The time you have is all (the time) you need to be a brain builder.”

Vroom also asks visitors to share “fun ways you’re already engaging and connecting with your child.” Viewers can enter ideas on the Vroom site or through various social media platforms.

Even better, there’s a smart phone app, called Daily Vroom, that “makes it easy to access fun Vroom activities any time to make the most of these precious years when the foundation for all future learning is happening.”

Click here to watch a short video on Vroom’s Brain Build

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The Department of Developmental Services and the WestEd Center for Prevention & Early Intervention are excited to announce the release of the latest parent resources related to the California State Systemic Improvement Plan (SSIP). The "Take a Minute - Relationships Matter!" flyer and video provide parents of infants and toddlers with developmental disabilities important information about how to develop strong relationships with their children, to improve their child's social and emotional development. The video and flyer are available to anyone in the Early Start community to watch and download. Take a minute to support the social and emotional development of the infant or toddler in YOUR life!

"Take a Minute: Relationships Matter!" video (7:28):

 

"Take a Minute - Relationships Matter!" Flyer:

 

 

These resources are related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit these resources in the Neighborhood here and he

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