Never Miss an Update!

To receive an e-mail whenever a new item is added, just click the “Follow” button at the very bottom of this page.

ifsp-dr (11)

Earthquake Resources

The National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) offers earthquake resources, focusing on things that can be done to support children before, during, and after an earthquake. For example, the site recommends that parents be encouraged to “give children factual information about earthquakes in simple terms,” appropriate to their developmental level. They also offer an app they created called Help Kids Cope, which provides information on how to talk with children of different developmental levels. Immediately after an earthquake, parents can “model calm behavior; provide simple but accurate information in a quiet, steady voice; encourage comforting or distracting activities; and practice their own self-care.” The NCTSN article concludes with a host of downloadable resources for both parents and teachers. Be sure to check out the earthquake resources so you can be prepared to support the families you serve. Feel free to leave us a comment below and tell us what you thought of this reso

Read more…

5145912060?profile=RESIZE_180x180The Daddy Factor: The Crucial Impact of Fathers on Young Children's Development, from Zero to Three, discusses exciting research evidence that supports the important role fathers play in the lives of their young children. From being involved during pregnancy to nurturing strong attachments afterward and everything in between (e.g., feeding, bathing, and playing together), fathers help children develop confidence which leads to stronger peer relationships as they grow older. The Daddy Factor also helps to raise IQ and improve communication and cognitive skills in the long term. The article summarizes its message by saying that “the more time fathers spend in enriching, stimulating play with their child . . . the better the child’s math and reading scores are at 10 and 11 years old.” So, the impact starts early and has lasting benefits that are evident years later. Join us in celebrating dads and the tremendous supports they have to offer young children.

Click here to view the article

Th

Read more…

Let’s Talk, Read, and Sing S.T.E.M.

4506051240?profile=RESIZE_400xDid you know that “research shows . . . having a strong foundation in early math . . . can lead to higher achievement in both math AND reading later in school.” That’s the kind of wisdom you’ll find in this tip sheet from the U.S. Departments of Health & Human Services and Education. The article defines S.T.E.M. (science, technology, engineering, and math) education in easy-to-understand terms then offers a long list of tips that families can try in their home language. These tips address such concept areas as measurement, counting, shapes, spatial relationships, patterns, and many more . . . all things inquisitive young minds are interested in learning. Give this tip sheet a read and see what S.T.E.M. skills you can support with children from birth to age three. You might be surprised! Leave us a comment below and let us know what your child found exciting about this important area of education.

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start P

Read more…

3710014094?profile=RESIZE_710xThe National Center for Pyramid Model Innovations describes the Pyramid Model as “a conceptual framework of evidence-based practices for promoting young children’s healthy social and emotional development.” It’s used by both families and professionals and is “based on over a decade of evaluation data.” Modeled after a “tiered public health approach” to providing supports to children and families, the Pyramid Model is built on a foundation of an effective workforce, meaning professionals who are able to “adopt and sustain these evidence-based practices.”

This Pyramid Model poster we’ve provided here describes three tiers of intervention, looking first at the base of the pyramid, then moving upward:

  • Universal Promotion: “Universal supports for all children through nurturing and responsive relationships and high-quality environments.” This includes practices that support the social and emotional development of all children.
  • Secondary Prevention: “Prevention . . . represents practices that
Read more…

This article from the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) is a quick read about co-regulation, which the author defines as “warm and responsive interactions that provide the support, coaching, and modeling children need to ‘understand, express, and modulate their thoughts, feelings, and behaviors’ (Murray et al. 2015, 14).” It’s part of the “Rocking and Rolling” column which appears in Young Children three times a year. “It Takes Two: The Role of Co-Regulation in Building Self-Regulation Skills” offers real-world examples of co-regulation strategies, with infants and toddlers of various ages, as well as detailed tips and things to think about and try.

Let us know about the co-regulation strategies you use in your work by leaving a comment below.

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

Read more…

"Let Me Tell You What I Want"

The Office of Special Education Program’s Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL) and the Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute bring us this week, “Let Me Tell You What I Want.” The intention behind this practice guide is to capitalize on the gestures infants naturally use to communicate and to help parents find ways to adapt gestures and signs for children with disabilities who may struggle with communication.

The brochure offers step-by-step guidance on how to observe a young child’s attempts at gestures, then reinforce what’s working and what makes sense within their family. It also gives three real-life examples of families putting the practice to use with amazing results. If you work with a family of a child who is learning to communicate, this practice guide might be just what you need. Leave us a comment below to let us know how you used the information and what the family thought.

 If you’d like to check out other practice guides from CELL, click here.

 This resource is related to

Read more…

six multicolored concentric rings as sound in original articleTips for Infants

Tips for Toddlers

These information-packed documents from the U.S., Department of Health and Human Services offer “tips to help caregivers use co-regulation to support early development of self-regulation skills” in infants and toddlers. Aimed at practitioners who work in childcare or other caregiving settings, the tips cover evidence-based practices in six broad topics:

  • Start with you;
  • Establish a warm and responsive relationship with each child;
  • Create calm and structured childcare environments;
  • Respond with warmth and structure during stressful moments;
  • Work closely with parents; and
  • Cultivate a sense of community.

These documents also include definitions, real-world examples, and strategies to try right away. Dive in to your appropriate age group and leave us a comment about the piece of information you are most excited to have discovered.

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out

Read more…

childhood memory collage

As a part of Tutorial 7: Recognizing and Addressing Trauma in Infants, Young Children, and their Families, "Module 4," the Center for Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation provides a short list of evidence-based therapeutic interventions for young children and their families affected by trauma. This resource includes “the treatment developer, intended age group, level of evidence, and a brief description of the focus and design of the intervention” and can be found here. Detailed fact sheets about each intervention, except for Preschool PTSD Treatment, may also be found here. “Many communities are building their capacity to provide services to young children and their families through these interventions.”

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

Read more…

blue teal orange green yellow and purple circles with child on the right“Children who have experienced trauma and require services need responses that are sensitive to what has happened to them and how it has shaped their behaviors.” Subsequently, an organization may need to examine their own culture, fundamental values, and functioning through self-assessment to identify needed modifications. The National Technical Assistance Center for Children’s Mental Health (NTACCMH) at Georgetown University’s Center for Child and Human Development offers us “Module 3: Creating Trauma-Informed Provider Organizations.” This online course consists of five video interviews: Introduction, Implementing Trauma-Informed Care and Supporting Policies, Sanctuary Model, Creating Cultures for Trauma-Informed Care and Risking Connection, and Secondary Trauma, which “provide background (information) and share lessons learned.” Visitors to the site will also find “a comprehensive list of links to additional resources and materials” by clicking on “Resources” at the bottom of the Mod

Read more…

green blue yellow red people forming a circleThe Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) released a Position Statement on Challenging Behavior and Young Children in July 2017.

The paper (posted above for easy reference) defines challenging behavior as “any repeated pattern of behavior . . . that interferes with or is at risk of interfering with the child’s optimal learning or engagement in pro-social interactions with peers and adults (Smith & Fox, 2003, p. 6).” It goes on to provide “a rationale for promoting social-emotional competence” as a means of addressing challenging behavior, focusing on family-centered practices and away from punishment and negative responses; building on strengths; and “culturally sustaining, equitable, and collaborative practices.” The paper describes a comprehensive approach to screening and assessment and multi-tiered, evidence-based strategies for support. It includes and extensive list of references for those who would like to explore these topics more in

Read more…

Help Me Grow California

orange purple blue yellow green flower petalsHelp Me Grow California is one of 17 state affiliates of the Help Me Grow National Center, “a system for improving access to existing resources and services” for young children. Building upon the idea that “early detection and connection to services lead to the best outcomes for children with developmental or behavioral concerns,” Help Me Grow empowers states to “implement effective, universal, early surveillance and screening for all children,” while providing families with much needed links to quality local programs.

Help Me Grow does not provide direct service to children and families; instead, it emphasizes four core components to build the capacity of communities to support families and children:

  1. Outreach to child health care providers,
  2. Outreach to the community,
  3. Centralized information and resource centers, and
  4. Ongoing data collection and analysis.

Help Me Grow California was established in 2011, and includes 11 county-level affiliates with a potential reach of more than one mill

Read more…