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10896378882?profile=RESIZE_400xFor parents of newborns and babies, few things are more upsetting than hearing their child crying, especially when nothing seems to bring their baby relief. This resource from Zero to Three explains the science behind why a baby’s cry can cause a parent distress and underscores the importance of parents taking a moment to care for themselves in order to better care for their young child. The article also offers tips for parents on how to cope when their baby is upset. Read more about this resource on the Zero to Three website, and consider sharing this link with the parents of infants and babies that you work with: https://www.zerotothree.org/resource/how-to-stay-calm-when-baby-wont-stop-crying/.

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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HOT OFF THE PRESS: Darby’s Legacy

10888827099?profile=RESIZE_180x180The Department of Developmental Services has recently approved the digital publication of Darby’s Legacy: Best Practices When Serving Families with Infants and Toddlers Who Are Medically Fragile. This document, endorsed by the California Interagency Coordinating Council on Early Intervention, is now available here on the Neighborhood, and elsewhere, to assist Early Start personnel who provide supports and services to families with young children who are medically fragile and likely in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Darby’s Legacy can be downloaded for later retrieval, emailing to a colleague or family, or for printing to share with others. Producing Darby’s Legacy, which honors the memory of Darby Jean and her family, was a labor of love for all involved.

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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Inclusive Early Education (IEE) Resources

Today’s message highlights the Inclusive Early Education (IEE) web page on the website of the Early Education Division at the California Department of Education (CDE). It can be found at https://www.cde.ca.gov/sp/cd/op/iee.asp.

Early Start service coordinators and family resource and support personnel can share the information from CDE with families who have children navigating or approaching transition from Early Start to preschool (at age 3). The page includes general information about the IEE Program and the State Early Education Impact Inclusion Work Group. If you check out the Work Group information, you may notice some familiar names from the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) and the Early Start Interagency Coordinating Council (ICC)! Collaborating on the work group is an ICC priority and initiative in support of this vision: “One System, All Children: Better Together”  

Elsewhere on the CDE site, you will find the page listing the inclusive programs funded in 2018-2019.

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Does AAC Really Work with Infants and Toddlers?

This week’s post was inspired by a blog by speech-language pathology professors Carole Zangari and Robin Parker, called “PrAACtical AAC.” (Their blog is a great find, too, if you’re interested in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC).)

The post we are featuring is from 2014, and it’s entitled, “Does AAC Really Work with Infants and Toddlers?” The blog post provides a link to a valuable research article on AAC. You can also see the article on the Neighborhood's page linked to below.

The authors of the research article, Branson and Demchak, offered four important conclusions:

  • Young children can successfully use both no tech AAC (e.g., signs, pictures) and low-to-high tech devices.
  • Communication partners were effective in creating communication opportunities for the learning and use of AAC in infants and toddlers.
  • Using AAC with young children facilitates “early learning experiences that can promote the child’s further development.”
  • “None of the studies reviewed supported the
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10845524289?profile=RESIZE_400xHelping young children learn can sometimes be difficult when the child has a hard time stayed focused or engaged in an activity. The professionals at the Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) have developed a resource for early learning personnel to support engagement of young children in classrooms; however, many of the tips they share can be modified for use in an infant or toddler’s natural environment. Some of the tips may even be useful to families to keep their child engaged in activities like mealtime or reading books before bed. You can access the resource at the following link: http://earlyliteracylearning.org/TACSEI_CELL/project_files/content/level_2/pdf/2_8b_DifficultEngage.pdf

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here or by looking under one of the Resource tabs and clicking on Additional Resources. As alw

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No parent or caregiver wants to hear their child is being aggressive. However, aggressive behavior is a natural part of healthy human development. In this week’s article from Zero to Three, parents are given examples of what to expect during different stages of development and what strategies might be helpful in the future.   

Knowing what to expect and then adjusting one’s actions can be valuable in producing a positive result. The author provides 12 helpful coping strategies which can help parents channel their child’s aggression during a transitional period.  

You can read the complete article by using the link below.  

https://www.zerotothree.org/resource/helping-young-children-channel-their-aggression/  

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood by clicking here or by looking under one of the Resource tabs and clicking on Additional Resources. As always,

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Podcast: Building Resilience Through Play

10824879698?profile=RESIZE_400xA few years ago, we shared a resource on the role of play in early childhood from the Harvard University Center on the Developing Child. Today we’re back with more helpful information on play from the same source; this time, in the form of a podcast episode focusing on how to build resilience in young children through play. “The Brain Architects” podcast features experts discussing a variety of topics related to early childhood development, and is hosted by the Center on the Developing Child. The runtime of this episode, “Building Resilience Through Play,” is around 55 minutes, and a transcript is helpfully provided on the website. Take a listen (or a read!) and let us know what you think about the discussion in the comments below.

Visit the Center on the Development Child’s website to listen to the podcast episode and read the transcript: https://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/podcast-resilience-play/

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended E

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baby clapping with caregiver This resource is quite the find! It’s chock full of great ideas to share with families about ways to “encourage infants to focus attention, use working memory, and practice basic self-control skills”—core components in the development of executive function and self-regulation. The suggestions the authors provide range from lap, hiding, and copying games to simple role plays, finger plays, and conversations. Many of the ideas will sound familiar and serve as a great way to reinforce the importance of supportive, responsive interactions between adults and children. They can also help parents recognize the incredible brain-building benefits of activities they already enjoy doing with their young children.

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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The folks at Very Well Family, a trusted pregnancy and parenting advice site, published  a highly informative and medically reviewed article in 2020, on How to Survive (and Thrive) When You’re Sleep Deprived. The posting includes an explanation of what to expect when baby arrives, statistics on parental sleep deprivation, how sleep deprivation affects our health, and tips on how parents can get more sleep. It also links to other articles on the Very Well Family site about establishing a sleep schedule for baby, getting your baby to sleep through the night, and postpartum depression. So check out How to Survive (and Thrive) When You’re Sleep Deprived. The parents you serve will thank you!

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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10769669858?profile=RESIZE_400xThe resource we’re highlighting on the Neighborhood this week is designed to give parents information and tips to support their child’s brain development from the Harvard University Center on the Developing Child. Building Babies’ Brains Through Play: Mini Parenting Master Class offers helpful research-based video clips, research summaries, handouts, and more to show parents how easy it can be to help their baby’s brain grow during serve-and-return interactions. This resource is great for any parent or caregiver interested in capitalizing on everyday moments to boost their child’s brain development. Check it out at the following link, and let us know what you think in the comments below: https://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/building-babies-brains-through-play-mini-parenting-master-class/

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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Head Start’s Early Childhood Learning & Knowledge Center recently updated their brief on “Infant and Toddler Behaviors that Can Challenge Adults.” The article includes information about what the research says, what challenging behaviors look like, and ideas to try. The authors do an excellent job in succinctly describing all these elements and provide links to other related articles and learning opportunities. The strategies offered are clear and seem easy to implement. Give this brief a read at the link above or the attachment below. Let us know your thoughts in the comment section. We love hearing from you.

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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10653628057?profile=RESIZE_400xThis week on the Blog, we’re highlighting a resource from The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) that gives parents strategies for supporting their child to respond to requests from others. Teaching Your Child to: Cooperate with Requests explains in family-friendly language why young children may be having trouble following rules and listening to requests, and offers tips to help parents support this important social-emotional skill in their children. Access the full resource here and feel free to share with families you work with: http://csefel.vanderbilt.edu/documents/teaching_cooperate.pdf. 

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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This week we’re featuring a series of articles from our friends at Zero to Three. They’re all about “What You Can Do to Support Babies’ Brain Development,” and are divided up by the age of the baby:  

From 2 to 6 Months 

From 6 to 12 Months 

From 12 to 18 Months 

From 18 to 24 Months 

From 24 to 36 Months 

Each handout is subdivided into sections about the various domains of development pertinent to each age group and offers tips and helpful hints about what you can do to support babies’ growth.  

Check them out and let us know in the comments below which handout you found the most useful. We love hearing from you. 

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here. 

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Parent’s Guide to Choosing Childcare

This week we’re highlighting a set of “Parent’s Guide to Choosing Childcare” tip sheets from our friends at the Department of Social Services, Community Care Licensing Division. They’re designed to assist parents in finding a “just right” fit for their childcare needs. The tip sheets include all kinds of links to important sites and PDF documents that will answer all kinds of childcare questions. Even better, the tip sheets are available in five different languages: English, Spanish, Chinese, Farsi/Dari, and Russian. Check them out and pass them along to the families you serve. Also, let us know what you think of these resources in the comments below.

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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10531066899?profile=RESIZE_400xThe State of Babies Yearbook is an annual publication from Zero to Three that features a number of metrics related to the health and well-being of the nation’s youngest inhabitants. Data points like number of children living in poverty, number of babies born preterm, and number of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) combined with information about each state’s policies around Medicaid, paid family leave, and other programs serving families paint a picture of how young children and their families are faring. This resource is downloadable as a PDF, but also features an interactive website that highlights key findings and allows users to easily view information by state. Check out the California page here: https://stateofbabies.org/state/california/. Let us know in the comments below; did any of our state’s data surprise you?

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighb

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10513181083?profile=RESIZE_400xThis week’s resource comes to us from the Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center at Gallaudet University. It’s entitled Sign Language Use for Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and Hearing Babies: The Evidence Supports It, and it may be just what you’ve been looking for.  You can access it on the Clerc Center’s website under Resources, then Publications, or on the article page here in the Neighborhood.

The Clerc Center collaborated with the American Society for Deaf Children to provide a Spanish translation to this publication.  This colorful handout is perfect to share with families who may be considering introducing signed language to their child. 

The Clerc Center also offers a wide variety of information in an array of formats, including the following webinars you might find interesting:

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10484889685?profile=RESIZE_400xThis week on the Blog, we’re talking about an article from the University of Cambridge titled “Playtime with Dad may improve children’s self-control.” The article summarizes a 2020 research study reviewing the ways fathers play with their kids, and the impact of father-child play on a young child’s development. The findings suggest that the type of play that fathers engage in with their children tend to be more physical in nature (e.g., tickling, chasing), and that this type of play seems to help young children learn how to manage emotions and regulate their behavior later in life. Read more about the findings here: https://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/playtime-with-dad-may-improve-childrens-self-control

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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This week we’re highlighting an informative article from the journal Childhood Obesity 15(3):206-215. In “Adverse Childhood Experiences in Infancy and Toddlerhood Predict Obesity and Health Outcomes in Middle Childhood,” McKelvey and her colleagues expand on the knowledge derived from the well-known Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) study, that indicated the “negative effects of childhood trauma on adult weight and health.” The authors specifically looked at the association between “ACEs in early childhood and their correlation to obesity and other health-related issues in middle childhood.”

Data came from 1335 demographically diverse families in an Early Head Start study, when children were ages 1, 2, 3, and 11. Analysis of these data indicated “significant associations between (ACEs) in infancy/toddlerhood and obesity, respiratory problems, taking regular nonattention-related prescriptions, and the parent’s global rating of children’s health at age 11.” Across all measures, “child

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10377694255?profile=RESIZE_400xThe California Department of Education’s Early Learning and Care Division developed a family-friendly resource aimed at parents who seek to better understand and support their child at any developmental stage. Ages and Stages of Development describes the various major developmental stages from birth through age 14 in terms of what children are like and what they need at each stage. Parents are offered tips on supporting their child’s development throughout this resource. Check it out at https://www.cde.ca.gov/sp/cd/re/caqdevelopment.asp.  

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

Please note: The Early Childhood Development Act of 2020 authorized the transfer of many childcare programs from the California Department of Education to the California Department of Social Services (CDSS) effective July 1, 2021. Information about the shift may be found here:

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"The Story of Max"

“The Story of Max” is an animated video resource designed to provide parents with an introduction to the Early Start program, guiding them through the evaluation, assessment, and IFSP processes to the point where services are received! Both English and Spanish versions are available for viewing here.

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