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Parent’s Guide to Choosing Childcare

This week we’re highlighting a set of “Parent’s Guide to Choosing Childcare” tip sheets from our friends at the Department of Social Services, Community Care Licensing Division. They’re designed to assist parents in finding a “just right” fit for their childcare needs. The tip sheets include all kinds of links to important sites and PDF documents that will answer all kinds of childcare questions. Even better, the tip sheets are available in five different languages: English, Spanish, Chinese, Farsi/Dari, and Russian. Check them out and pass them along to the families you serve. Also, let us know what you think of these resources in the comments below.

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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10531066899?profile=RESIZE_400xThe State of Babies Yearbook is an annual publication from Zero to Three that features a number of metrics related to the health and well-being of the nation’s youngest inhabitants. Data points like number of children living in poverty, number of babies born preterm, and number of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) combined with information about each state’s policies around Medicaid, paid family leave, and other programs serving families paint a picture of how young children and their families are faring. This resource is downloadable as a PDF, but also features an interactive website that highlights key findings and allows users to easily view information by state. Check out the California page here: https://stateofbabies.org/state/california/. Let us know in the comments below; did any of our state’s data surprise you?

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighb

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10513181083?profile=RESIZE_400xThis week’s resource comes to us from the Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center at Gallaudet University. It’s entitled Sign Language Use for Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and Hearing Babies: The Evidence Supports It, and it may be just what you’ve been looking for.  You can access it on the Clerc Center’s website under Resources, then Publications, or on the article page here in the Neighborhood.

The Clerc Center collaborated with the American Society for Deaf Children to provide a Spanish translation to this publication.  This colorful handout is perfect to share with families who may be considering introducing signed language to their child. 

The Clerc Center also offers a wide variety of information in an array of formats, including the following webinars you might find interesting:

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10484889685?profile=RESIZE_400xThis week on the Blog, we’re talking about an article from the University of Cambridge titled “Playtime with Dad may improve children’s self-control.” The article summarizes a 2020 research study reviewing the ways fathers play with their kids, and the impact of father-child play on a young child’s development. The findings suggest that the type of play that fathers engage in with their children tend to be more physical in nature (e.g., tickling, chasing), and that this type of play seems to help young children learn how to manage emotions and regulate their behavior later in life. Read more about the findings here: https://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/playtime-with-dad-may-improve-childrens-self-control

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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This week we’re highlighting an informative article from the journal Childhood Obesity 15(3):206-215. In “Adverse Childhood Experiences in Infancy and Toddlerhood Predict Obesity and Health Outcomes in Middle Childhood,” McKelvey and her colleagues expand on the knowledge derived from the well-known Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) study, that indicated the “negative effects of childhood trauma on adult weight and health.” The authors specifically looked at the association between “ACEs in early childhood and their correlation to obesity and other health-related issues in middle childhood.”

Data came from 1335 demographically diverse families in an Early Head Start study, when children were ages 1, 2, 3, and 11. Analysis of these data indicated “significant associations between (ACEs) in infancy/toddlerhood and obesity, respiratory problems, taking regular nonattention-related prescriptions, and the parent’s global rating of children’s health at age 11.” Across all measures, “child

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10377694255?profile=RESIZE_400xThe California Department of Education’s Early Learning and Care Division developed a family-friendly resource aimed at parents who seek to better understand and support their child at any developmental stage. Ages and Stages of Development describes the various major developmental stages from birth through age 14 in terms of what children are like and what they need at each stage. Parents are offered tips on supporting their child’s development throughout this resource. Check it out at https://www.cde.ca.gov/sp/cd/re/caqdevelopment.asp.  

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

Please note: The Early Childhood Development Act of 2020 authorized the transfer of many childcare programs from the California Department of Education to the California Department of Social Services (CDSS) effective July 1, 2021. Information about the shift may be found here:

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"The Story of Max"

“The Story of Max” is an animated video resource designed to provide parents with an introduction to the Early Start program, guiding them through the evaluation, assessment, and IFSP processes to the point where services are received! Both English and Spanish versions are available for viewing here.

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10244246296?profile=RESIZE_180x180This week we are highlighting a resource from the Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) entitled, “Understanding Your Child’s Behavior: Reading Your Child’s Cues from Birth to Age 2.” It’s a very interesting and quickread, filled with practical examples and age-specific suggestions. The authors also include,“Three Steps to Understanding Your Baby’s or Toddler’s Behavior,” which is intended to help parents sort out the meaning of the cues they may see and hear from their young child. There’s also a fourth bonus step on viewing tantrums as communication with a variety of effective ways to respond. Check out this week’s resource here, and let us know what you think in the comments below.

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM).To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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This academic article gives an overview of social-emotional developmental milestones in early childhood with the goal of helping professionals identify issues with a child’s social-emotional development as early as possible. In this resource, you’ll find descriptions of important terms in social-emotional development, social-emotional milestones with descriptors, and a list of standardized screening instruments for social-emotional development.

To read this article, visit https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK534819/. Take a look at this resource to refresh your understanding of social-emotional milestones!

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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10161234657?profile=RESIZE_400xLast year, Head Start’s Early Childhood Learning & Knowledge Center (ECLKC) updated their “Effective Practice Guidelines” on social and emotional development. This Web resource is divided into four subdomains:

  • Relationships with Adults,
  • Relationships with Other Children,
  • Emotional Functioning, and
  • Sense of Identity and Belonging.

Each subdomain is further divided into four sections: Know, See, Do, and Improve.

In these sections you will find teaching practices for infants and toddlers; videos featuring young children; suggested practices for teachers and home visitors; and planning goals, actions steps, focused observations, reflections, and feedback to support the work of professionals who work with very young children… including Early Start service providers.

There’s a lot of information in this resource, which we’re sure will be useful in your work with children and families. After you look at the resource, drop us a note in the comments below and tell us which tip you found to be

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In collaboration with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have revised their developmental milestone checklists for the first time since the originals were published in 2004. From the AAP website:

“Changes to the guidance include:

  • Adding checklists for ages 15 and 30 months; now there is a checklist for every well-child visit from 2 months to 5 years.
  • Identifying additional social and emotional milestones (e.g., Smiles on their own to get your attention, age 4 months).
  • Removing vague language like “may” or “begins” when referring to certain milestones.
  • Removing duplicate milestones.
  • Providing new, open-ended questions to use in discussion with families (e.g., Is there anything that your child does or does not do that concerns you?).
  • Revising and expanding tips and activities for developmental promotion and early relational health.”

To view the milestones, visit https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/actearly/milestones/index.html.

For mo

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The folks at Zero to Three have a set of age-based handouts you might be interested in, focusing on development from birth to age 36 months. You can access them online in both English and Spanish. Each one includes a “What to Expect” chart, frequently asked questions, a research summary, and information about common parenting challenges. Enjoy! And let us know in the comments below how you might put these handouts to use in your practice with families.

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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How Do Babies Learn to Crawl?

9914254476?profile=RESIZE_400xHow Do Babies Learn to Crawl? is an interesting article from our colleagues at Zero to Three. The authors take the pressure off parents who might be expecting crawling by a specific age. They also define three different types of movement that many babies go through, which includes the traditional hands and knees crawl pattern, with the caveat that “it can take a while to get moving, and that’s okay.” They offer half a dozen strategies parents can try to support their babies in learning to move. Ultimately, the authors say, “there’s no wrong way to crawl” and note that some babies skip that stage altogether! Let us know your thoughts in the comments below. 

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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Today on the Blog, we’re highlighting an infographic on the impact of racism on child development from the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. This infographic illustrates the effects of racism on the developing brains and bodies of young children of color and draws connections between the stress of experiencing racism and long-term health effects. The infographic is available as a downloadable PDF, and the text of the infographic is available at https://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/racism-and-ecd/. Check it out and let us know in the comments how you might use this in your early intervention practice.

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This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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As part of their Parenting for Social Justice series, Zero to Three has published Celebrating Differences: Antiracist Parenting Right From the Start. The article includes “five facts about how children come to understand differences.” These include:

  1. All children notice differences;
  2. It’s not okay to use differences as an excuse to stereotype others;
  3. Racism is learned;
  4. Racial bias starts early, between ages two and four; and
  5. Diversity makes a difference.

The author supports the idea that “talking to children about racism is part of our responsibility as parents” but acknowledges that this may not always be easy. She suggests reflecting on one’s own biases and re-thinking one’s views on race. This can sometimes be uncomfortable or even painful, so reaching out for support may be challenging but necessary. The article also provides some suggestions for useful next steps in the process of Celebrating Differences: Antiracist Parenting Right From the Start.

This resource is related to one o

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15 Principles for Reading to Deaf Children

The Clerc Center at Gallaudet University offers 15 Principles for Reading to Deaf Children. The principles are described as “best practices for how to read aloud to Deaf and Hard of Hearing children” in American Sign Language. The principles were derived from research on how Deaf parents read to their Deaf children and are presented here as tips for both parents and educators about the skills and strategies useful in sharing books with young children. The principles are contained in one 15-minute video, which is captioned and voiced for non-signers. The site also provides bookmarks within the video so that a viewer can access a specific strategy without having to scan through the entire video. We think you’ll like it, so take a look. Let us know what you think of 15 Principles for Reading to Deaf Children in the comments below.

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Ne

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9725376269?profile=RESIZE_400xThis time on the Blog, we’re highlighting a resource from the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) that supports early intervention and early education professionals in cultivating anti-bias settings and experiences for infants and toddlers and their families. Reflection: The First Step for Addressing Bias in Infant and Toddler Programs notes that being aware of our own beliefs and biases is the key first step in an anti-bias approach to working with young children and their families. The article goes on to offer reflective questions and tips for increasing self-awareness of one’s feelings and reactions. Read the full article here: https://www.naeyc.org/resources/pubs/yc/nov2017/rocking-and-rolling

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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The School-Ready Child

Zero-to-Three offers a colorful infographic, entitled “The School-Ready Child” (o “Listos para la escuela” en español). In it the authors describe the reasons why getting ready for school begins in early childhood and the need for public policies that “focus on the healthy development of babies and toddlers as an essential part of preparing children for success.” They outline five important features of the school-ready child:

1. It’s all about relationships.
2. Everyday experiences shape early learning.
3. The importance of emotions.
4. The importance of play.
5. What a school-ready child looks like.

It’s a great reminder of the value of early intervention. EI providers support families as they support their young children to be successful in school and beyond.

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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Unilateral Hearing Loss: Tips for Parents

9614439478?profile=RESIZE_400xThis week on the blog, we’re highlighting a resource for parents of infants with unilateral hearing loss, meaning that hearing loss has been identified in one ear. This resource briefly describes some of the unique hearing and language needs of babies with unilateral hearing loss, as well as strategies for supporting an infant to attend to sounds and voices. The article concludes with tips for supporting overall development and keeping an eye out for possible warning signs of developmental delays. Check out the resource on the Hands & Voices website, and feel free to share with any parent who may find it useful: https://handsandvoices.org/articles/early_intervention/uni_loss_tips.html

Hands & Voices is an international organization that supports children who are deaf or hard of hearing and their parents. To learn more about Hands & Voices, including the California chapter, visit https://handsandvoices.org/index.htm

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recomme

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Zero to Three offers an excellent video resource entitled, “From Feelings to Friendships: Nurturing Healthy Social-Emotional Development in the Early Years.” It is part of their “Magic of Everyday Moments” series. The video describes the importance of the parent-child bond in building a child’s “ability to form relationships with others, express emotions, and face difficult challenges.” Supportive relationships encourage young children to “explore the world, develop empathy, and understand the difference between right and wrong.” The video offers ways parents can develop strong bonds and nurturing relationships with their young children. There’s also a tip sheet, which we’ve included here for easy access. It might be a great handout for the families you serve. Let us know in the comments below what you think. 

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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