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How Do Babies Learn to Crawl?

9914254476?profile=RESIZE_400xHow Do Babies Learn to Crawl? is an interesting article from our colleagues at Zero to Three. The authors take the pressure off parents who might be expecting crawling by a specific age. They also define three different types of movement that many babies go through, which includes the traditional hands and knees crawl pattern, with the caveat that “it can take a while to get moving, and that’s okay.” They offer half a dozen strategies parents can try to support their babies in learning to move. Ultimately, the authors say, “there’s no wrong way to crawl” and note that some babies skip that stage altogether! Let us know your thoughts in the comments below. 

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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Today on the Blog, we’re highlighting an infographic on the impact of racism on child development from the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. This infographic illustrates the effects of racism on the developing brains and bodies of young children of color and draws connections between the stress of experiencing racism and long-term health effects. The infographic is available as a downloadable PDF, and the text of the infographic is available at https://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/racism-and-ecd/. Check it out and let us know in the comments how you might use this in your early intervention practice.

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This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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As part of their Parenting for Social Justice series, Zero to Three has published Celebrating Differences: Antiracist Parenting Right From the Start. The article includes “five facts about how children come to understand differences.” These include:

  1. All children notice differences;
  2. It’s not okay to use differences as an excuse to stereotype others;
  3. Racism is learned;
  4. Racial bias starts early, between ages two and four; and
  5. Diversity makes a difference.

The author supports the idea that “talking to children about racism is part of our responsibility as parents” but acknowledges that this may not always be easy. She suggests reflecting on one’s own biases and re-thinking one’s views on race. This can sometimes be uncomfortable or even painful, so reaching out for support may be challenging but necessary. The article also provides some suggestions for useful next steps in the process of Celebrating Differences: Antiracist Parenting Right From the Start.

This resource is related to one o

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The Story of Max

We are happy to announce a new resource for professionals to use and share with their communities!

The Story of Max is an animated video resource designed to provide parents with an introduction to the Early Start program, guiding them through the evaluation, assessment, and IFSP processes to the point where services are received!

We have provided the video in embed form, as well as for download. This video is available in both English and Spanish. If you would like to download either version, click the previous links.

English Version to embed:

<div style="padding:56.25% 0 0 0;position:relative;"><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/618197694?h=fe82248d10&amp;badge=0&amp;autopause=0&amp;player_id=0&amp;app_id=58479" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; fullscreen; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen style="position:absolute;top:0;left:0;width:100%;height:100%;" title="The Story of Max"></iframe></div><script src="https://player.vimeo.com/api/player.js"></script>

 

Spanish Version

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15 Principles for Reading to Deaf Children

The Clerc Center at Gallaudet University offers 15 Principles for Reading to Deaf Children. The principles are described as “best practices for how to read aloud to Deaf and Hard of Hearing children” in American Sign Language. The principles were derived from research on how Deaf parents read to their Deaf children and are presented here as tips for both parents and educators about the skills and strategies useful in sharing books with young children. The principles are contained in one 15-minute video, which is captioned and voiced for non-signers. The site also provides bookmarks within the video so that a viewer can access a specific strategy without having to scan through the entire video. We think you’ll like it, so take a look. Let us know what you think of 15 Principles for Reading to Deaf Children in the comments below.

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Ne

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9725376269?profile=RESIZE_400xThis time on the Blog, we’re highlighting a resource from the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) that supports early intervention and early education professionals in cultivating anti-bias settings and experiences for infants and toddlers and their families. Reflection: The First Step for Addressing Bias in Infant and Toddler Programs notes that being aware of our own beliefs and biases is the key first step in an anti-bias approach to working with young children and their families. The article goes on to offer reflective questions and tips for increasing self-awareness of one’s feelings and reactions. Read the full article here: https://www.naeyc.org/resources/pubs/yc/nov2017/rocking-and-rolling

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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The School-Ready Child

Zero-to-Three offers a colorful infographic, entitled “The School-Ready Child” (o “Listos para la escuela” en español). In it the authors describe the reasons why getting ready for school begins in early childhood and the need for public policies that “focus on the healthy development of babies and toddlers as an essential part of preparing children for success.” They outline five important features of the school-ready child:

1. It’s all about relationships.
2. Everyday experiences shape early learning.
3. The importance of emotions.
4. The importance of play.
5. What a school-ready child looks like.

It’s a great reminder of the value of early intervention. EI providers support families as they support their young children to be successful in school and beyond.

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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Unilateral Hearing Loss: Tips for Parents

9614439478?profile=RESIZE_400xThis week on the blog, we’re highlighting a resource for parents of infants with unilateral hearing loss, meaning that hearing loss has been identified in one ear. This resource briefly describes some of the unique hearing and language needs of babies with unilateral hearing loss, as well as strategies for supporting an infant to attend to sounds and voices. The article concludes with tips for supporting overall development and keeping an eye out for possible warning signs of developmental delays. Check out the resource on the Hands & Voices website, and feel free to share with any parent who may find it useful: https://handsandvoices.org/articles/early_intervention/uni_loss_tips.html

Hands & Voices is an international organization that supports children who are deaf or hard of hearing and their parents. To learn more about Hands & Voices, including the California chapter, visit https://handsandvoices.org/index.htm

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recomme

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Zero to Three offers an excellent video resource entitled, “From Feelings to Friendships: Nurturing Healthy Social-Emotional Development in the Early Years.” It is part of their “Magic of Everyday Moments” series. The video describes the importance of the parent-child bond in building a child’s “ability to form relationships with others, express emotions, and face difficult challenges.” Supportive relationships encourage young children to “explore the world, develop empathy, and understand the difference between right and wrong.” The video offers ways parents can develop strong bonds and nurturing relationships with their young children. There’s also a tip sheet, which we’ve included here for easy access. It might be a great handout for the families you serve. Let us know in the comments below what you think. 

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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Children Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing PLUS

The National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management (NCHAM) at Utah State University published an e-book in 2019, entitled “A Resource Guide for Early Hearing Detection & Intervention.” Today’s post focuses on Chapter 6 of that publication: “Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing PLUS.”

The chapter defines Deaf or Hard of Hearing (or D/HH) Plus as children who are D/HH and also have developmental or medical difficulties. Research from Gallaudet University indicates that approximately 40% of the pediatric D/HH population falls into this category, likely related to “some of the risk factors for hearing loss . . . such as genetic syndromes, prematurity, congenital infections, and meningitis.”

The chapter also outlines other data that compares the rate of certain disabilities in children who are D/HH Plus to the rates seen in the general public. For example, intellectual disability is over 10 times more likely in the pediatric D/HH Plus population than in the general population, an

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Caucasian mother holding an infantThe Harvard University Center on the Developing Child has created a handy infographic for parents and professionals alike to explain the basics of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs). ACES and Toxic Stress: Frequently Asked Questions describes how ACES work to impact very young children and their families and how the effects of ACES can be mitigated. The accompanying text answers questions such as:

  • What are ACEs?
  • How do ACEs relate to toxic stress?
  • What is trauma, and how does it connect to ACEs and toxic stress?

Check out the Center on the Developing Child website to view and download this useful graphic to share with families or refresh your knowledge of ACES in early childhood: https://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/aces-and-toxic-stress-frequently-asked-questions/

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

Photo by Polina Tankilevitch from 

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Am I Really My Child’s First Teacher?

Today’s article answers the age-old question, “Am I Really My Child’s First Teacher,” with a resounding, “Yes!” The folks at NAEYC provide a rationale for the claim and offer examples of routines-based interventions that support literacy development, like telling stories, looking around, and making books available. It’s a quick read. Check it out and let us know what you think in the comments below.

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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9191263666?profile=RESIZE_400xToday on the Neighborhood Blog, we’re highlighting a resource that’s all about supporting infants and toddlers who are dual language learners (DLLs). Rocking and Rolling: Nurturing Infants and Toddlers with Diverse Language Experiences reviews the research on language development for young children who are DLLs and offers tips for early childhood professionals to help multilingual babies and toddlers in their care learn, grow, and feel safe. Whether or not you speak a child’s home language, this publication has strategies for partnering with families and providing supports for children who are DLLs. View this resource in its entirety at the National Association for the Education of Young Children website: https://www.naeyc.org/resources/pubs/yc/may2020/rocking-and-rolling.

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

Photo by William Fortunato from Pexels

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Building a Family Engagement Culture

In a “From Principles to Practice” Learning Brief, entitled “Building a Family Engagement Culture,” the authors addressed two questions:

  • What does authentic family engagement look like? and
  • How can we “engage diverse families in responsive and culturally relevant ways”?

In order to answer these questions, local advocates in L.A. County “developed a shared definition of family engagement” and outlined five guiding principles to “build upon the work of national advocates and stress the need to embed practices across the systems and settings that serve families with young children.”

The five guiding principles are as follows: 

  1. Foster mutual respect, trusting relationships, and shared responsibility and leadership;
  2. Engaging families where they are;
  3. Respect, value, and be responsive to cultural and linguistic assets;
  4. Support strong social networks and connections; and
  5. Foster an integrated and family-centered systems approach.

Learn more about family engagement and the guiding principles

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Today on the Blog, we're highlighting The Manifesto for Race Equity and Parent Leadership in Early Childhood Systems. Published in 2019 by the Center for the Study of Social Policy, The Manifesto invites early childhood systems and programs to commit to "address[ing] inequities and racism by giving parents a voice and opportunity to be engaged and lead at all levels of change."The Manifesto includes five "Core Commitments" for early childhood systems, with strategies to implement each of the commitments. This resource is also available in Spanish.


To learn more about the Manifesto, visit https://cssp.org/resource/parent-leader-manifesto/.


This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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Hands & Voices and the Family Leadership in Language & Learning Center (FL3) offer “Eight Reasons to Say Yes to Early Intervention” in this week’s resource. Hands & Voices and FL3 focus on families of children who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing, but many of the reasons they suggest apply to families much more broadly. Ranging from support for intervention embedded into everyday routines, the importance of accessing the wisdom of other parents, and becoming a strong advocate for your child, the information presented will likely ring true for a wide range of families. Check out the infographic below to learn about the ways early intervention can support young children and their families.

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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5 Things You Can Do to Make Your Family Strong

The Family Focus Resource & Empowerment Center in L.A. produced this terrific video to share “Five Things You Can Do to Make Your Family Strong.” The content is based on the Five Protective Factors you may have heard about. Watch the video to learn more. It’s also available with Spanish subtitles if you click here.

For more information about Early Start, visit the Early Start web page on the DDS web site, here: https://www.dds.ca.gov/services/early-start/

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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Black Maternal Health Week 2021

8785335891?profile=RESIZE_400xThis week on the Neighborhood, we are recognizing Black Maternal Health Week (BMHW; April 11-17) and sharing resources on improving outcomes for Black mothers and addressing racial disparities in maternal health and mental health care. This year marks the fourth annual national BMHW campaign, sponsored by the Black Mamas Matter Alliance. Below are some of the many available resources on Black maternal health; visit the Black Mamas Matter Alliance website for more resources.

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Early Intervention Handouts from CDE

The California Department of Education (CDE) recently distributed a handout entitled “Early Intervention Special Education Resources.” It gives a brief overview of three important programs:

  • Desired Results (DR) Access Project
  • Seeds of Partnership Project
  • Supporting Inclusive Practices (SIP)

Read the overview here:

If you’d like to read more about the DR Access Project, check out “Resources to Support the Use of the DRDP with Infants and Toddlers with IFSPs”:

 

Finally, if you’d like to read more about Supporting Inclusive Practices, take a look at this handout:

 

Very interesting reading. Let us know what you think in the comments below.

This resource is related to one or more competencies in the ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM). To find out more, visit this resource in the Neighborhood here.

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8670351261?profile=RESIZE_400xThis week marks the one-year anniversary of the World Health Organization declaring COVID-19 to be a global pandemic. Nearly every aspect of life has changed since then, including early learning and care experiences for young children and their families. What has been the impact of this pandemic on young children’s learning and well-being? The National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) set out to answer this question through national surveys to parents of children ages 3-5. NIEER researchers described the results of these surveys in a recent publication entitled “Seven Impacts of the Pandemic on Young Children and their Parents: Initial Findings from NIEER’s December 2020 Preschool Learning Activities Survey.” This report compares factors like preschool participation, supports and services to children with disabilities, social-emotional wellbeing of young children, and parental hardships both between Spring and Fall of 2020, as well as between pre-pandemic times and Fall 2

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