Resources on All Service Types

3821285300?profile=RESIZE_710xThis article from the National Institute for Children’s Health Quality (NICHQ) titled “Fathers: Powerful Allies for Maternal and Child Health” summarizes research on the critical importance of fathers’ role during pregnancy and in a child’s early years, and offers practical recommendations on how to support the involvement of fathers. Although geared mainly toward health professionals, some proposed approaches are relevant to (or could be adapted for) early intervention professionals and settings.

Click here to read this article on the NICHQ website.

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“Self-regulation is the act of managing thoughts and feelings to enable goal-directed actions.” It’s a set of skills we begin working on right after birth and continue refining through adulthood. Self-regulation is an important goal for infants and toddlers as it enables them to shift the focus of their attention, soothe themselves, adjust their behavior, and seek help from others when it’s needed.

This two-page snapshot from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services describes ways in which parents and caregivers can observe self-regulation in very young children, strategies they can use to support its development, and the research behind “lessons learned about interventions to promote self-regulation in infants and toddlers.”…

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The Center for the Developing Child at Harvard University is an excellent resource for information on many aspects of early childhood. In a recent video, entitled “Play in Early Childhood: The Role of Play in Any Setting,” the creators address the science behind “three core principles that can guide what society needs to do to help children and families thrive.”

 

These principles include “supporting responsive relationships, strengthening core life skills, and reducing sources of stress.”

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3710014094?profile=RESIZE_710xThe National Center for Pyramid Model Innovations describes the Pyramid Model as “a conceptual framework of evidence-based practices for promoting young children’s healthy social and emotional development.” It’s used by both families and professionals and is “based on over a decade of evaluation data.” Modeled after a “tiered public health approach” to providing supports to children and families, the Pyramid Model is built on a foundation of an effective workforce, meaning professionals who are able to “adopt and sustain these evidence-based practices.”

This Pyramid Model poster we’ve provided here describes three tiers of intervention, looking first at the base of the pyramid, then moving…

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3679909502?profile=RESIZE_710x Teaching Your Child to: Identify and Express Emotions from the Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) at Vanderbilt University offers actionable tips for caregivers on how to use everyday opportunities to help children learn about their feelings.  

You can check out this resource and more at the CSEFEL site here: http://csefel.vanderbilt.edu/

Download the resource directly to your device here: https://wested.box.com/shared/static/x0lyydphf30decczxpdv7pqd2hngjhfk.pdf

 

 

The ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM) describes…

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toddler-aged girl in dress walking down aisle of store holding caneToday in the Neighborhood News, we’re looking at one of the solely low incidence disabilities, specifically, children who are blind or have low vision, and information that may be useful to their families. In Orientation and Mobility for Babies and Toddlers: A Parent’s Guide, Dr. Merry-Noel Chamberlain, an orientation and mobility specialist, describes the importance of starting early with cane training. Dr. Chamberlain states, “If you want your child to be an independent traveler. . . the very best thing you can do is to introduce her to the cane at an…

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The National Child Traumatic Stress Network and the National Center for PTSD have come together to produce a handout on Psychological First Aid, which offers parents “Tips for Helping Infants and Toddlers after Disasters.” This detailed and easy-to-read resource examines behaviors young children typically display after a disaster as well as what parents should know about and do in response to those behaviors.

Here’s an example:

If your child has problems sleeping . . .

Understand that children often dream about things they fear and can be scared of going to sleep . . . when children are scared, they want to be with people who help them feel safe, and they worry when you are not together . . .

Ways to Help: Hold him and tell him that he is safe, that you are there and will not leave . . . this…

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To support parents and caregivers to engage in “serve and return” during everyday activities, the Harvard University Center on the Developing Child created a family-friendly two-page guide that lists five steps for completing serve and return interactions. The resource also includes a link where caregivers can watch an introductory video, learn more about the science behind serve and return, and access even more materials to help them support their baby’s development. Check out this resource online at https://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/5-steps-for-brain-building-serve-and-return/, or in Spanish at https://developingchild.harvard.edu/translation/5-pasos-para-el-desarrollo-mental-saque-y-volea/.…

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This article from the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) is a quick read about co-regulation, which the author defines as “warm and responsive interactions that provide the support, coaching, and modeling children need to ‘understand, express, and modulate their thoughts, feelings, and behaviors’ (Murray et al. 2015, 14).” It’s part of the “Rocking and Rolling” column which appears in Young Children three times a year. “It Takes Two: The Role of Co-Regulation in Building Self-Regulation Skills” offers real-world examples of co-regulation strategies, with infants and toddlers of various ages, as well as detailed tips and things to think about and try.

Let us know about the co-regulation strategies you use in your work by leaving a comment below.

The ICC-Recommended Early…

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From the US Department of Health and Human Services' Safe to Sleep campaign: a publication for families and caregivers on safe sleep practices for infants. More resources can be found here: http://safetosleep.nichd.nih.gov/ 

Click here to download this resource.

 

 

The ICC-Recommended Early Start Personnel Manual (ESPM) describes core knowledge and role-specific competencies needed for early intervention service provision, incorporating current research and evidence in the field of…

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